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post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

The Independent: Embedded with medics in Afghanistan, I witnessed the fall out of the war

Mark de Rond, Professor of Organisational Ethnography at Cambridge Judge Business School, reflects on his time at Camp Bastion in Afghanistan. “During the first of a six-week tour of duty with a surgical team at Camp Bastion’s field hospital, I…

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The insurreality of war

Writing a book is said to be cathartic. Professor Mark de Rond of Cambridge Judge Business School begs to differ, as he wrestled for five years with understanding his experience among army medics in Afghanistan. Donald Trump's about-face diktat that…

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A Marine walks toward two landing blackhawk helicopters. It's just another day at the office for him.

Doctors at war

New book by Professor Mark de Rond of Cambridge Judge Business School, Doctors at War, explores the courage, compassion and comic tragedy of modern war - with a few echoes from "M*A*S*H". The tragi-comic role of military surgeons in Afghanistan…

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Mark de Rond at Camp Bastion

The Conversation: How context makes PTSD hard to understand, and not just for Trump

Mark de Rond, Professor of Organisational Ethnography at Cambridge Judge Business School, writes on war-related post-traumatic stress disorder and why it’s so difficult to understand it. “A better understanding of context – an acceptance that psychological reaction to ‘war’ goes…

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How context makes conflict trauma hard to understand, and not just for Trump

When US presidential hopeful Donald Trump jumped with characteristic abandon into the debate over post-traumatic stress disorder, his comments that some veterans are not "strong enough" to handle the mental stresses of combat were broadly criticised. War veterans, and the…

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Soldier carrying another wounded soldier in the battle field. Acton photo of war-time action.

Have we misunderstood post-traumatic stress disorder?

In understanding war-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a person's cultural and professional context is just as important as how they cope with witnessing wartime events, says a new study in the Academy of Management Journal. It's long been assumed that…

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